Week 3 of the A to Z Challenge

Hope you all had a nice weekend! Here’s a recap of what was posted on the blog in the third week of the A to Z Challenge! K is for Know your Italian Pasta L is for Limoncello M is for Mozzarella N is for Neapolitan Cuisine O is for Olive Oil P is for…

P is for Pizza

I’ve never met a pizza I didn’t like. To me, it is literally one of the best inventions to have ever happened in the culinary world. Made in Naples, pizza are a versatile recipe, which you can adjust in whatever way you like. A pizza with only cheese, or just meat, or solely vegetables. You…

O is for Olive Oil

My absolute, number one, favourite ingredient is for the letter O: Olive Oil. I prefer any type of oil over butter, but the Queen of oils is the one for me. With so many different olive variations, producing techniques and regions, there is an endless supply of this golden liquid. It all started an immense…

N is for Neapolitan Cuisine

Basically everything you love about Italian food, has its origins in Naples. Think of pizza, mozzarella, parmigiana di melanzana (aubergines with Parmesan cheese and tomato sauce) and many more… Naples is one of the oldest cities in Italy, and has been ruled by many different empires and kingdoms: the ancient Greeks and Romans, and the kings from…

M is for Mozzarella

I’ve mentioned mozzarella before in my post about the Joy of Italian Cheeses. But honestly, I feel like this cheese deserves some alone-time in the spotlights. Besides that, I wouldn’t do the Italian cuisine theme of this challenge any justice without writing at least one post about this yummy cheese. How often do you get…

L is for Limoncello

Limoncello. The deliciously acidic lemon infused liqueur so characteristic for Italy. Namely southern Italy, where the most beautiful lemons are produced. Think of the Gulf of Naples, the Amalfi coast, as well as the islands of Capri and Sicily. The lemon liqueur is made of the zest of the lemons, preferably the Sorrento type. The zest,…

K is for Know Your Italian Pasta

We all know spaghetti, lasagna, and macaroni. Some are also really fond of penne (me!), ravioli, and farfalle. But there are so many more great Italian pastas yet to be discovered! These are the ones that I tried during my recent trip to Rome. The gnocchi was familiar to me, but I have never actually…

J is for Joy of Italian Cheeses

What’s a month of Italian cuisine posts, without one on the fabulous cheeses the country produces? Here are my favourites: Pecorino My personal favourite is, and forever will be, Pecorino cheese. Made of sheep’s milk (hence the name, as pecora is Italian for sheep), there are several regional versions. The Pecorino Romano is most popular outside…

I is for Italian Food in 5 Pictures

A sneak preview of upcoming posts about my holiday in Rome! A food picture for every day that I have stayed and eaten in this beautiful city. Swordfish alla Siciliana Pasta Carbonara Spaghetti alla vongole Carpaccio   Scalloppini alla limone More on everything I ate plus tips on where to go in Rome are to come…

G is for Gelato

Oh Gelato, the wonderful creamy goodness. One of Italy’s most popular import products. Originally from Sicily (hey, we’re re-visiting this island again! The Sicilians are a bunch of inventive people…), the Italian word gelato is derived from the Latin word gelatus, which literally means frozen. So you’re eating frozen. Just let it go.   Anyways, the story…

F is for Foccacia with Sea Salt, Rosemary, and Olives

After visiting Capri, Emilia-Romagna & San Marino, and Sicily, we’re traveling to yet another region in Italy. It’s time to take a trip to Liguria, in the northwestern part of the boot, neighbouring France. Supposedly, the name derives from the Latin word for hearth or place of baking: focus. Which seems like a probable reason to…

E is for Even More Crostini

Crostini might just be the best thing to have ever been created. I’m not kidding. A crunchy base of bread, infused with garlic and olive oil, topped off with whatever combination of fresh ingredients you can think of. You might’ve noticed the terms bruschetta and crostini being interchanged, although technically they are different. Crostini are typically round…